Tuesday, September 29, 2009

test, ignore


\int_{0}^{1}\frac{x^{4}\left(1-x\right)^{4}}{1+x^{2}}dx
=\frac{22}{7}-\pi


You know, I think I won't delete this. It's a celebration of my having embedded some TeX using the advice at Bot Cyborg.

8 comments:

hvintus said...

Unfortunately, it doesn't work in RSS aggregators like Google Reader.

Kevin Reid said...

In your feed it shows up as the unrendered TeX.

sigfpe said...

Yeah, it's not a great method is it. It also relies on a 3rd party web site which doesn't make me happy.

Erik Max Francis said...

I also noticed that even a browser it took a moment to render the image, and you could see the underlying TeX before it was rendered and replaced.

Andrej Bauer said...

I use ASCIIMathML on my blog and it works ok, except users need to have MathML activated. There is also jsMath which seems more flexible. Why don't you try one of these?

sigfpe said...

Well jsMath is looking the best so far.

But the Javascript dependencies in all of these methods are bothering me. Won't work in feeds etc.

I'm tempted to learn Google's APIs and tweak my simple markup language to support uploading of images generated from embedded TeX. All round it's a pretty unsatisfactory state of affairs.

Andrew Sackville-West said...

yet another version of the java script solution: LaTeXMathML which I've had good success. I just put it up on one of my own servers and linked to it in my blogger template. It suffers from the same drawbacks -- lag in rendering, doesn't render in feeds, etc. But there it is.

sigfpe said...

I think a good solution for me right now would be to do markup offline so that I don't have an external dependency. Maybe I can borrow the guts of one of these javascript solutions to do that. The problem then is to find a subset of outputs that is visible by, say, 95% of readers without forcing them to download fonts. I guess I can just post another test. I already have a markup of my own that handles some simple TeX type stuff to convert things like \Delta, ^ and _ to lowest common denominator HTML.

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